The State of The World’s Human Rights 2014/15

HUMAN RIGHTS, 13 Apr 2015

Amnesty International – TRANSCEND Media Service

The Amnesty International’s Annual Report provides a comprehensive overview of the state of human rights in 160 countries and territories during 2014. It also celebrates those who stand up for human rights across the world, often in difficult and dangerous circumstances. It represents Amnesty International’s key concerns throughout the world, and is essential reading for policymakers, activists and anyone with an interest in human rights.

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The inability of world leaders to deal with the changing face of conflict, including a growing threat from armed group attacks, has left millions of people unprotected and in grave danger, Amnesty International warned as it launched its annual assessment of the world’s human rights.

Without urgent action and a fundamental shift in approach, the rights group says there is strong reason to believe the next few years could see:

  • more civilian populations forced to live under the quasi-state control of armed groups, subject to abuse, persecution and attacks
  • deepening threats to freedom of expression and other rights, including violations caused by new draconian anti-terror laws and intrusive mass surveillance
  • a worsening humanitarian and refugee crisis with even more people displaced by conflict as governments continue to block borders and the international community fails to provide assistance and protection

If lessons are not learned – if governments continue to ignore the relationship between the current security crisis and the rights failures which have led us here – then what was a bad year for rights in 2014 could get even worse in the years to come,” said Salil Shetty, Secretary General of Amnesty International.

Download pdf file:  THE STATE OF THE WORLD’S HUMAN RIGHTS 2014-15

Go to Original (and Choose Report Language to Download) – amnesty.org

 

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