20 Foods High in Provitamin A

HEALTH, 8 May 2017

Dr. Atli Arnarson | Authority Nutrition – TRANSCEND Media Service

Vitamin A is a fat-soluble vitamin that plays an essential role in maintaining vision, body growth, immune function and reproductive health.

Getting adequate amounts of vitamin A from your diet should prevent the symptoms of deficiency, which include hair loss, skin problems, dry eyes, night blindness and increased susceptibility to infections.

Deficiency is a leading cause of blindness in developing countries. In contrast, most people in developed countries get enough vitamin A from their diet.

The recommended dietary allowance (RDA) is 900 mcg for men, 700 mcg for women and 300–600 mcg for children and adolescents.

The RDA provides enough vitamin A for the vast majority of people.

Put simply, a single daily value (DV) of 900 mcg is used as a reference on nutrition labels in the U.S. and Canada.

This article lists 20 foods that are rich in vitamin A, plus an additional 20 fruits and vegetables rich in provitamin A (1).

10 Vegetables High in Provitamin A

Your body can produce vitamin A from carotenoids found in plants.

These carotenoids include beta-carotene and alpha-carotene, which are collectively known as provitamin A.

However, about 45 percent of people carry a genetic mutation that significantly reduces their ability to convert provitamin A into vitamin A (2, 3).

Depending on your genetics, the following vegetables might provide considerably less vitamin A than indicated.

  1. Sweet Potato (cooked)—204 percent DV per serving

1 cup: 1,836 mcg (204 percent DV)
100 grams: 1,043 mcg (116 percent DV)

  1. Winter Squash (cooked)—127 percent DV per serving

1 cup: 1,144 mcg (127 percent DV)
100 grams: 558 mcg (62 percent DV)

  1. Kale (cooked)—98 percent DV per serving

1 cup: 885 mcg (98 percent DV)
100 grams: 681 mcg (76 percent DV)

  1. Collards (cooked)—80 percent DV per serving

1 cup: 722 mcg (80 percent DV)
100 grams: 380 mcg (42 percent DV)

  1. Turnip Greens (cooked)—61 percent DV per serving

1 cup: 549 mcg (61 percent DV)
100 grams: 381 mcg (42 percent DV)

  1. Carrot (cooked)—44 percent DV per serving

1 medium carrot: 392 mcg (44 percent DV)
100 grams: 852 mcg (95 percent DV)

  1. Sweet Red Pepper (raw)—29 percent DV per serving

1 large pepper: 257 mcg (29 percent DV)
100 grams: 157 mcg (17 percent DV)

  1. Swiss Chard (raw)—16 percent DV per serving

1 leaf: 147 mcg (16 percent DV)
100 grams: 306 mcg (34 percent DV)

  1. Spinach (raw)—16 percent DV per serving

1 cup: 141 mcg (16 percent DV)
100 grams: 469 mcg (52 percent DV)

  1. Romaine Lettuce (raw)—14 percent DV per serving

1 large leaf: 122 mcg (14 percent DV)
100 grams: 436 mcg (48 percent DV)

10 Fruits High in Provitamin A

Provitamin A is generally more abundant in vegetables than fruits. But a few types of fruit provide good amounts, as shown below.

  1. Mango—20 percent DV per serving

1 medium mango: 181 mcg (20 percent DV)
100 grams: 54 mcg (6 percent DV)

  1. Cantaloupe—19 percent DV per serving

1 large wedge: 172 mcg (19 percent DV)
100 grams: 169 mcg (19 percent DV)

  1. Pink or Red Grapefruit—16 percent DV per serving

1 medium grapefruit: 143 mcg (16 percent DV)
100 grams: 58 mcg (6 percent DV)

  1. Watermelon—9 percent DV per serving

1 wedge: 80 mcg (9 percent DV)
100 grams: 28 mcg (3 percent DV)

  1. Papaya—8 percent DV per serving

1 small papaya: 74 mcg (8 percent DV)
100 grams: 47 mcg (5 percent DV)

  1. Apricot—4 percent DV per serving

1 medium apricot: 34 mcg (4 percent DV)
100 grams: 96 mcg (11 percent DV)

  1. Tangerine—3 percent DV per serving

1 medium tangerine: 30 mcg (3 percent DV)
100 grams: 34 mcg (4 percent DV)

  1. Nectarine—3 percent DV per serving

1 medium nectarine: 24 mcg (3 percent DV)
100 grams: 17 mcg (2 percent DV)

  1. Guava—2 percent DV per serving

1 medium guava: 17 mcg (2 percent DV)
100 grams: 31 mcg (3 percent DV)

  1. Passion Fruit—1 percent DV per serving

1 medium fruit: 12 mcg (1 percent DV)

100 grams: 64 mcg (7 percent DV)

How Do You Meet Your Vitamin A Requirements?

You can easily meet your requirements for vitamin A by regularly eating some of the foods listed in this article. Many foods also contain added vitamin A, including cereals, margarine and dairy products.

Since vitamin A is fat-soluble, it is more efficiently absorbed into the bloodstream when eaten with fat. Most animal-sourced foods that are rich in vitamin A are also high in fat, but the same doesn’t apply to most plant sources of provitamin A.

You can improve your absorption of provitamin A from plant sources by adding a dash of oil to your salad.

However, as mentioned above, some people have a genetic mutation that makes the conversion of provitamin A into vitamin A much less efficient (2, 3).

Because of this, vegans should take supplements or make sure to eat plenty of the fruits and vegetables listed above.

Fortunately, foods abundant in vitamin A are usually easy to come by and most are an excellent addition to a healthy diet.

_______________________________________

Reposted with permission from our media associate Authority Nutrition.

Go to Original – ecowatch.com

 

Share or download this article:


DISCLAIMER: In accordance with title 17 U.S.C. section 107, this material is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. TMS has no affiliation whatsoever with the originator of this article nor is TMS endorsed or sponsored by the originator. “GO TO ORIGINAL” links are provided as a convenience to our readers and allow for verification of authenticity. However, as originating pages are often updated by their originating host sites, the versions posted may not match the versions our readers view when clicking the “GO TO ORIGINAL” links. This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.


There are no comments so far.

Join the discussion!

We welcome debate and dissent, but personal — ad hominem — attacks (on authors, other users or any individual), abuse and defamatory language will not be tolerated. Nor will we tolerate attempts to deliberately disrupt discussions. We aim to maintain an inviting space to focus on intelligent interactions and debates.

*