Danger of Drones Highlighted by Near Collision with Airliner in Florida

IN FOCUS, 12 May 2014

Associated Press – The Guardian

• FAA says incident took place in March near Tallahassee
• Risk of drone being ingested by airliner engine ‘is very real’

US officials say an airliner nearly collided with a drone in the sky over Florida in March [2014].

Jim Williams of the Federal Aviation Administration’s unmanned aircraft systems office acknowledged the incident on Thursday [8 May 2014] at a San Francisco drone conference, citing it as an example of the risks posed by drones.

“The risk for a small UAS [unmanned aircraft system] to be ingested into a passenger airline engine is very real,” Williams told the conference.

The use of drones has increased dramatically in the past few years as the devices have become cheaper and more accessible to the average consumer. The near collision was reported to air traffic control on 22 March by the pilot of an American Airlines Group jet as the pilot approached the Tallahassee runway en route from Charlotte, North Carolina.

“The airline pilot said that the UAS was so close to his jet that he was sure he had collided with it,” Williams said. “Thankfully, inspection of the airliner after landing found no damage.”

The pilot said the drone was at an altitude of about 2,300 feet (700 metres).

The FAA has investigated the incident, but in a statement released on Friday said it had been unable to identify the pilot or the drone’s operator.

“Our challenge is to integrate unmanned aircraft into the busiest, most complex airspace in the world,” the agency said. “Introduction of unmanned aircraft into America’s airspace must take place incrementally and with the interest of safety first.”

The law currently requires that private individuals flying drones notify the airport operator and air traffic control facility when flying within five miles (8km) of an airport, it added.

An American Airlines spokesman, Paul Flaningan, said the airline was aware of the alleged incident and that it was investigating the matter.

Go to Original – theguardian.com

 

Share this article:


DISCLAIMER: The statements, views and opinions expressed in pieces republished here are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of TMS. In accordance with title 17 U.S.C. section 107, this material is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. TMS has no affiliation whatsoever with the originator of this article nor is TMS endorsed or sponsored by the originator. “GO TO ORIGINAL” links are provided as a convenience to our readers and allow for verification of authenticity. However, as originating pages are often updated by their originating host sites, the versions posted may not match the versions our readers view when clicking the “GO TO ORIGINAL” links. This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.


Comments are closed.