‘Amazing News’: Rights Groups Celebrate after Italy Bans Use of Circus Animals

ANIMAL RIGHTS - VEGETARIANISM, 13 November 2017

Jessica Corbett – Common Dreams

Advocates for animal welfare praised the Italian parliament while calling on other nations, including the United States, to follow suit.

Animal welfare advocates praised the Italian parliament for passing on Wednesday, November 8 a ban on wild animals in circuses, and called on other nations to implement similar measures.
(Photo: Pawsitive Candie N/Flickr/cc)

8 Nov 2017 – Animal rights advocates are celebrating a move by the Italian parliament today to, over the next year, phase out the use of all animals in circuses and traveling shows.

“We applaud Italy and urge countries like the U.K. and the U.S. to follow this example and end this cruelty,” said Jan Creamer, president of Animal Defenders International (ADI), which supported the launch of the bill.

“Traveling from place to place, week after week, using temporary collapsible cages and pens, circuses simply cannot provide for the needs of the animals,” Creamer said in an ADI statement that also featured declarations from the Federation of Veterinarians of Europe and the British Veterinary Association that there are no means by which the physiological, mental, and social needs of these animals can be adequately met within a traveling circus.

Creamer traveled to Italy to advocate for the bill’s passage. Following a screening of her group’s film Lion Ark, which is about rescuing animals from illegal circuses in Bolivia, she addressed Italian lawmakers at a workshop to further explain how ADI’s undercover investigations “have shown the violence and abuse that is used to force these animals to obey and perform tricks.”

“Italy has an estimated 100 circuses with some 2,000 animals making this one of the biggest victories in the campaign to stop circus suffering,” according to ADI’s Stop Circus Suffering campaign. The European nation joins 40 other countries and several more municipalities that have outlawed the use of animals in circuses and traveling shows.

The news from Italy comes on the heels of a similar move by the Indian government, and just days before ADI plans to host a week of action, beginning November 13, to support the Traveling Exotic Animal & Public Safety Protection Act (also called TEAPSPA or H.R.1759), a bill in the U.S. House of Representatives that would prohibit traveling wild and exotic animal acts.

Animal rights advocates celebrated the new law on Twitter, and called on other countries to follow suit:

 

________________________________________________

Jessica Corbett is a staff writer for Common Dreams.

 

 

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 License

Go to Original – commondreams.org

 

Share or download this article:


DISCLAIMER: In accordance with title 17 U.S.C. section 107, this material is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. TMS has no affiliation whatsoever with the originator of this article nor is TMS endorsed or sponsored by the originator. “GO TO ORIGINAL” links are provided as a convenience to our readers and allow for verification of authenticity. However, as originating pages are often updated by their originating host sites, the versions posted may not match the versions our readers view when clicking the “GO TO ORIGINAL” links. This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.


There are no comments so far.

Join the discussion!

We welcome debate and dissent, but personal — ad hominem — attacks (on authors, other users or any individual), abuse and defamatory language will not be tolerated. Nor will we tolerate attempts to deliberately disrupt discussions. We aim to maintain an inviting space to focus on intelligent interactions and debates.

 (please enter the four letters and numbers you see above, no spaces)