We Can Find the Truth, but Where Can We Find Hope?

TRANSCEND MEMBERS, 2 May 2022

David Adams | Transition to a Culture of Peace – TRANSCEND Media Service

1 May 2022 – This month’s CPNN bulletin is devoted to the courageous individuals who dare to seek and publish the truth in the face of the censorship and outright lies of the information war between NATO and Russia.

I add the following taken from the April 22 entry on the Facebook page of Jan Oberg. He is a tireless fighter for the truth, and is a member of TRANSCEND Media Service, which provides links to many of the articles we republish in CPNN.

“Denmark’s foreign policy is today reduced to what can be done with weapons, soldiers, barbed wire, Defense Intelligence agents, etc. And then more weapons – that ‘the Danes can be proud of’.

“Has one single initiative taken from the Danish side – alone or with others or from the EU – for mediation, negotiations and demilitarization? Of course not because:

“Of course, the purpose is not primarily to support Ukraine, but to satisfy the US/NATO’s desire to make the war in Ukraine so long that it undermines Russia knowing that at the same time it makes Ukraine bleed even more.

“Mette “Kogeplade” Frederiksen knows how to do that and at the same time get some photo opportunities.

“Imagine that in this terrible, destructive war of occupation – as it is produced – that it would be possible for all possible leaders of state to visit Ukraine.

“One has to wonder why they didn’t visit the targets during the NATO and the US wars – Belgrade, Baghdad, Damascus, Tripoli – but it was many times harder. And the attackers were our friends.

“In Denmark, this is called value-based foreign policy. I would call it worthless, unprincipled, and thoughtless. And in relation to NATO expansion: shameless.”

Oberg’s analysis of April 22 was confirmed by the the remarks of US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin on April 25 following his visit to the Ukraine when he said that the goal was defeat Russia so decisively on the battlefield that it will be deterred from launching such an attack ever again.

Although, as Oberg describes, Denmark, like the rest of the European Union supports the role of the US and NATO, fortunately most of the countries of Africa and Asia do not agree, and a few countries in Latin America also have the courage to say “no”.

But where are we headed?

I suppose it will lead to a divided Ukraine like North and South Korea, with enormous human suffering and armaments on both sides that will be always poised to explode again into war. And with new expansions of NATO making it even more menacing to Russia.

Europe which gave us World War I and II, now seems preparing to give us World War III. Responding to the remarks quoted above by the US Secretary of Defense, the Foreign Minister of the Russian Federation, Sergey Lavrov said that the conflict in Ukraine risked escalating into a third world war and that NATO was “in essence” engaged in a proxy war with Moscow by supplying Kyiv with weapons.

As both sides pour their resources into armaments, there is little left for health care, for education, and for other human needs. Their economies, already strained by the COVID pandemic, continue down the path towards a total crash, first economic then political.

And what about human hopes and dreams? Can our children and grandchildren still hope for a culture of peace? Can they still sing for peace and write their dreams and send them aloft on balloons for the International Day of Peace, not only in English, but also in Russian and Ukrainian?

Or are they and we completely swallowed up in the rush to war?

We can find the truth, but how can we find hope? Can we still dream of the promised land of peace?

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Dr. David Adams is a member of the TRANSCEND Network for Peace Development Environment and coordinator of the Culture of Peace News Network. He retired in 2001 from UNESCO where he was the Director of the Unit for the UN International Year for the Culture of Peace.  Previously, at Yale and Wesleyan Universities, he was a specialist on the brain mechanisms of aggressive behavior, the history of the culture of war, and the psychology of peace activists, and he helped to develop and publicize the Seville Statement on Violence. Send him an email.

Go to Original – decade-culture-of-peace.org


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