Charles Bronfman Prize to Jewish Humanitarians Whose Work Is of Universal Benefit

MIDDLE EAST & NORTH AFRICA, APPEALS, 26 Nov 2012

Antonio C. S. Rosa, editor – TRANSCEND Media Service

The Charles Bronfman Prize recognizes Jewish humanitarians whose work, while inspired by personal Jewish values, is of universal benefit to all people.

Nominations for The Charles Bronfman Prize 2013 are open November 1, 2012. The Charles Bronfman Prize accepts nominations in all areas of humanitarian endeavor across a broad spectrum of disciplines. Past recipients have distinguished themselves through their work in genetics, the environment, medical education, humanitarian relief, the transformation of public education and human rights.

Nominators from distinguished international institutions (including universities, scientific institutions, medical centers, the public sector, the non-profit sector, religious institutions, community leaders, and philanthropists) have helped identify qualified nominees. In turn, Judges of the Prize have been privileged to consider hundreds of qualified nominations from around the globe — young women and men whose diverse range of humanitarian efforts include ground-breaking applications of medicine and science, education, human rights, conflict resolution, community development and compassionate care.

Who We Are Looking For:

We are looking for today’s Jewish heroes: next-generation leaders who have a vision for change that will better the world in a meaningful way, and who have created a mechanism for acting on that vision in ways that deliver measurable results. We evaluate that against the following criteria:

Individuals or teams, not organizations. We want to hear about the individuals who created the vision on which the organization is based.
Nominees who have not reached their 50th birthday by the close of the nomination period on January 15, 2013. There are no exceptions to this date.
Next generation leaders who have a vision for change that will better the world in a meaningful way.
Nominees who have created a mechanism for acting on their vision in ways that deliver measurable results.
Nominees who exhibit innovation, leadership and impact in their chosen field.
Nominees whose Jewish values and universal regard for humanity inspire and serve.

What does the Charles Bronfman Prize look for in nominees?

The Charles Bronfman Prize seeks to honor today’s Jewish heroes: Next generation leaders under the age of 50 who have a vision for change that will better the world in a meaningful way, and who have created a mechanism for acting on that vision and delivered measurable results. Past recipients have distinguished themselves through their work in genetics, the environment, medical education, humanitarian relief, the transformation of public education and human rights.

Will the Prize accept nominations who are 50 years of age or older?

No. The Charles Bronfman Prize seeks to honor young humanitarian leaders and provide inspiration to the next generations. Therefore, nominees should not have reached their 50th birthday by the closing date for nominations, January 15th, 2013.

Does The Prize require nominees to be Jewish?

Yes. Since the core of this award is to celebrate the unique connection between Jewish values and humanitarian endeavor, we felt that this was a valid parameter worthy of focus within the emerging field of humanitarian awards. Namely, that nominees should self-define as being Jewish – however that manifests itself to the individual nominee. This distinguishes this award from others and is in line with the original vision of The Prize founders.

Does the endeavor my nominee has initiated need to be Jewish?

No. The Charles Bronfman Prize celebrates the intersection of Jewish values, and universal humanitarian endeavors. While nominees must self-identify as Jewish, their endeavors may be universal, contributing to the betterment of the world at large.

Can I nominate myself for the Prize?

No. All nominations must be presented by a nominating team consisting of a Nominator and three References. Through their respective prisms they can present you and your work most effectively against the selection criterion. The Nominator is the point of contact between the Prize, the Nominee and the nominating team during the nomination and evaluation process.

Can I submit more than three letters of reference on behalf of my nominee?

No. Please submit only what is requested on the nomination form. In fairness to the cohort of Prize nominees, only three letters of reference can be accepted. Please note that, if more than three letters of reference are submitted, only the first three references listed on the nomination form will be acknowledged and passed forward for evaluation.

Does the Prize consider late nominations?

No. All nominations must be received in the Prize office no later than Tuesday, January 15, 2013. Nominations move forward for consideration together as soon as the nomination process closes. In fairness to the cohort of Prize nominees, late nominations will neither be considered nor acknowledged. We encourage Nominators to consider applying next year if they have missed this year’s deadline.

Will our nomination be acknowledged?

Yes. All nominations will be acknowledged in writing, by email to all members of the nominating team, with a copy to the Nominee.

When will we know the outcome?

All nominating teams and nominees will be notified if they have not been successful in the late spring. The Prize recipient will be announced in early June.

Can we re-nominate our candidate?

Yes; and you can request that parts of an old nomination be reactivated. However, in fairness to your nominee, we strongly advise that the Nominator’s letter and the curriculum vitae be updated so that the Prize can be made aware of the recent accomplishments of your nominee  model for future generations.

For more info see http://www.thecharlesbronfmanprize.com/nomination-process/evaluatio…

 

This article originally appeared on Transcend Media Service (TMS) on 26 Nov 2012.

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