4 Tons of Contaminated Rainwater Leaks at Fukushima Plant

ENERGY, 7 Oct 2013

Reuters - The Asahi Shimbun

Oct 2, 2013 – Four tons of rainwater contaminated with low levels of radiation leaked at the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant during an operation to transfer the water between tank holding areas, the operator said Oct. 1.

Tokyo Electric Power Co. has been trying to contain contaminated water at the Fukushima site after it found 300 tons of radioactive water had leaked from a tank at the plant.

Fukushima suffered triple nuclear meltdowns and hydrogen explosions after a March 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

Heavy rain during a recent typhoon flooded one of the tank holding areas where TEPCO stores excess water flushed over damaged reactors to keep them cool, a spokesman said.

After tests last month showed the rainwater contained 160 becquerels of radiation per liter, a relatively low level, TEPCO officials decided to transfer the water to another holding area for tanks, the spokesman said.

During the transfer, a worker found the leak, which the company estimated to be 4 tons and was absorbed into the ground, the spokesman said.

The company faces the prospect of more heavy rain in the next few days as another storm approaches Japan from the south.

TEPCO has been pumping hundreds of tons of water a day over the Fukushima reactors to keep them cool and storing the radioactive wastewater in tanks above ground. In August, the utility said at least one of those hastily built tanks was leaking.

It has also found high levels of radiation just above the ground near other tanks, suggesting widespread structural problems with the tanks.

TEPCO’ stock, which was up in the morning, fell after the utility announced the latest problem with water storage, closing down 4.1 percent.

Earlier on Oct. 1, TEPCO said one of three units for injecting nitrogen into the damaged reactors shut down due to a worker mishandling the equipment, but was restarted later.

TEPCO injects nitrogen into the reactors to prevent explosions similar to those that rocked the site in the early days of the disaster.

Go to Original – asahi.com

 

Share this article:


DISCLAIMER: The statements, views and opinions expressed in pieces republished here are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of TMS. In accordance with title 17 U.S.C. section 107, this material is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. TMS has no affiliation whatsoever with the originator of this article nor is TMS endorsed or sponsored by the originator. “GO TO ORIGINAL” links are provided as a convenience to our readers and allow for verification of authenticity. However, as originating pages are often updated by their originating host sites, the versions posted may not match the versions our readers view when clicking the “GO TO ORIGINAL” links. This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to advance understanding of environmental, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, and social justice issues, etc. We believe this constitutes a ‘fair use’ of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for research and educational purposes. For more information go to: http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/17/107.shtml. If you wish to use copyrighted material from this site for purposes of your own that go beyond ‘fair use’, you must obtain permission from the copyright owner.


Comments are closed.