Articles by Robert V. Daniels

We found 5 results.


Leon Trotsky (7 Nov 1879 – 21 Aug 1940)
Robert V. Daniels | Encyclopædia Britannica - TRANSCEND Media Service, 4 Nov 2019

In the struggle for power following Vladimir Ilich Lenin’s death, Joseph Stalin emerged as victor, while Trotsky was removed from all positions of power and later exiled (1929). He remained the leader of an anti-Stalinist opposition abroad until his assassination by a Stalinist agent.

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Leon Trotsky (7 Nov 1879 – 21 Aug 1940)
Robert V. Daniels | Encyclopædia Britannica - TRANSCEND Media Service, 5 Nov 2018

In the struggle for power following Vladimir Ilich Lenin’s death, Joseph Stalin emerged as victor, while Trotsky was removed from all positions of power and later exiled (1929). He remained the leader of an anti-Stalinist opposition abroad until his assassination by a Stalinist agent.

→ read full article

Leon Trotsky (7 Nov 1879 – 21 Aug 1940)
Robert V. Daniels - Encyclopædia Britannica, 6 Nov 2017

In the struggle for power following Vladimir Ilich Lenin’s death, Joseph Stalin emerged as victor, while Trotsky was removed from all positions of power and later exiled (1929). He remained the leader of an anti-Stalinist opposition abroad until his assassination by a Stalinist agent.

→ read full article

Leon Trotsky (7 Nov 1879 – 21 Aug 1940)
Robert V. Daniels - Encyclopædia Britannica, 7 Nov 2016

In the struggle for power following Vladimir Ilich Lenin’s death, Joseph Stalin emerged as victor, while Trotsky was removed from all positions of power and later exiled (1929). He remained the leader of an anti-Stalinist opposition abroad until his assassination by a Stalinist agent.

→ read full article

Leon Trotsky (7 Nov 1879 – 21 Aug 1940)
Robert V. Daniels - Encyclopædia Britannica, 2 Nov 2015

Arrested in January 1898 for revolutionary activity, Bronshtein spent four and a half years in prison and in exile in Siberia, during which time he married his coconspirator Aleksandra Sokolovskaya and fathered two daughters. He escaped in 1902 with a forged passport bearing the name Trotsky, which he adopted as his revolutionary pseudonym.

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