“The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it.”

MEMORABLE QUOTES, 20 Dec 2021

Karl Marx – TRANSCEND Media Service

Karl Heinrich Marx was a German philosopher, critic of political economy, economist, historian, sociologist, political theorist, journalist, and socialist revolutionary. Born in Trier, Germany, Marx studied law and philosophy at the universities of Bonn and Berlin.

CIRCA 1865: Karl Marx (1818-1883),
(Photo by Roger Viollet Collection/Getty Images)


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One Response to ““The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways. The point, however, is to change it.””

  1. Gary Steven Corseri says:

    No doubt Marx had original interpretations and ideas. He could be revolutionary in these areas, and inspirational–the way Rousseau was in France. Unfortunately, both Rousseau and Marx lacked the discretionary, critical judgment of Voltaire–who remarked about his contemporary, Rousseau, that he might not agree with Rousseau but he’d fight with all his might for Rousseau’s right to believe and express his ideas!
    A man with a more critical mind, someone like George Orwell (Eric Blair), could dissect Marx’s meme-like “the point is to change it” [the world], and add something like–“change it for the better”! (Wasn’t that Orwell’s approach in ANIMAL FARM?–i.e., “all animals are equal, but some are more equal than others”?!)
    Can our contemporary world rise above thinking in memes?